Wednesday, November 30, 2016

Colonial Pipeline Crisis: It's About A Lot More Than Rising Gas Prices

Wednesday, November 16, 2016

Buffalohair: Humanities Pilgrimage: Standing Rock North Dakota

Humanities Pilgrimage: Standing Rock North Dakota

a1-standing-rockStories abound about the Besieged Standing Rock Sioux of North Dakota, their struggle against the Dakota Access Pile Line (DAPL) or ‘Black Snake’ and endless western media prevarications. But while on assignment at the Oceti Sakowin Camp I also found another story. Granted, it was unexpected but it was also hard to ignore for it brought me back to the very essence of my core beliefs. In a way this became my personal pilgrimage.

 

From the moment you approach the Cannonball River one is taken by the size of the encampments on both banks. Then there is the line of traffic waiting to pass the security check point as supporters, supplies and lookie loos pile into camp. You must go through orientation and your credentials verified to acquire a press pass. Only after you met their criteria you are allowed to take videos and photographs in permissible areas with the permissions of the occupants.

 

It is advised you heed the warning about taking photos of sacred sites, camp fires, lodges etc. Though you may fool people and take videos of something sacred on the sly you are not fooling spirits of the spirit world. Everyone is watching you betraying your vow to honor a sacred tradition. And what timing eh. Nothing like doing something completely stupid & disrespectful during a spiritual event of this magnitude for no other reason than you can. How far beyond stupid is that eh?

 

If you are planning a trip to Standing Rock bare in mind this is a budding community not a KOA Camp Ground for this is home to many people who’ve moved to camp permanently. It’s a traditional native community intertwined with societies, clans and private aspects of indigenous life foreign to other cultures. Familiarize yourself with proper protocols and clearly defined tribal precepts of what is hallowed for there are no exceptions to this rule. Just show respect, ask questions, no biggie.

 

Our camp had a majestic view of the spotlights that would shine down onto camp throughout the night. A supporter commented, “Reminds me of the West Bank”, then I noticed the Palestinian flag. It was humbling to note people from around the world who were so driven by compassion they made the pilgrimage to Standing Rock. Through the rigors and excitement of the day a story began to evolve, a story of the human condition.

 

Though people came from many dogmas & ideological principals they understood the deeper significants this joining of cultures has in the grand scheme of things. Where other ‘signs’ were simply ignored or passed off as coincidence, the DAPL – Black Snake Debacle struck a cord within prophetic philosophies around the world. It was good to hear people speaking comfortably about the realities of prophecy, especially from a multi principled perspective.

 

What I found way cool was the younger generation I encountered. These folks were awake, aware and wanting to make a difference for humanities sake. They were up to speed in the issues that mattered. It was great to hear well read and knowledgeable young people sharing their observations in life, motivations and how much they cared for their fellow human beings & Ma Earth. And the skills they offered were off the charts professionally speaking, holay!

 

Various technologies were in review, including innovative housing, holistic medicalOLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA and mental health facilities under construction within this sprawling encampment along the Cannon Ball River. I happened onto a yurt building class and was spell bound by this unique structure and it’s simplicity in assembly. But alas I resigned myself to my cousins dilapidated tent that survived a savage wind storm in a previous run to the rez. Some rope, Duct Tape and we were good to go.

 

“Mni Wiconi, Water is Life” the mantra of the Water Protectors would resonate throughout the camp as a reminder of what we are here for. The hustle and bustle of daily life was apparent as mothers would prepare meals and various groups would conduct meetings while kitchens prepared to feed the masses. Sanitation and other infrastructure services continued quietly and unnoticed in what could have been construed as total chaos. This was truly a ‘civil society’, well except for the Bluecoats & their toys peering down on us.

 

As I meandered throughout the camp I could not help but imagine how life was for my people back in the day. I pondered how life could have been, where humanity was an axiom not just a noun. My thoughts turned to the prophecies and oral traditions of my people. Then I remembered the teachings of my late uncle Martin Burnt Fingernail and the visions we shared. If only he could see this now, or maybe he already does.

 

Our wonderful view of flood lamps was overshadowed by a perfect amphitheater since I could hear drums from the meeting area and around camp. After walking around all day it was a joy to lay down and listen to sacred songs, prayers and sagged prophetic teachings from noble speakers.

 

In spite of all the chaos I did find peace of mind at the Oceti Sakowin Camp for I witnessed prophecy in motion.

 

Like I’ve said many times before, you better have a handle on true spirituality and know who your ancestors are because the show has only just begun…

 

Mni Wiconi Water is Life…

 

Your Devil’s Advocate

 

Buffalohair

Friday, November 4, 2016

Native American man turns down offer of $1.8 million for his home - in order to preserve Sacred Land

The Vintage News

October 31 at 3:19pm ·

Native American man turns down offer of $1.8 million for his home – in order to preserve Sacred Land

Deep in the heart of the city of Miami, about two blocks from Brickell Street, sits a small wooden house with a garden and a natural spring. The property i
thevintagenews.com

Journalist covering Standing Rock captures video of police shooting her point blank with rubber bullet

Lakota Country Times shared a link.

7 hrs ·

This is the latest evidence of escalating police violence.
vox.com|By Victoria M. Massie

This plane was documented dropping an "Apple" from the plane.

Myron Dewey added 2 new photos.

7 hrs · Cannon Ball, ND ·

This plane was documented dropping an "Apple" from the plane.

Charges will be filed ASAP, an apple dropped at that height could potentially kill a person.

We need help finding who the pilot is of the plane.

Interactive Time-Lapse Map Shows How the U.S. Took More Than 1.5 Billion Acres From Native Americans

This interactive map, produced by University of Georgia historian Claudio Saunt to accompany his new book West of the Revolution: An Uncommon History o ...
slate.com

The Indigo Girls Launch #NoDAPL Boycott to Protest Pipeline Owner Who Runs Major Folk Music Festival

Honor the Earth

Many musicians, including Emily Saliers and Amy Ray, better known as the folk duo the Indigo Girls, are now banding together to confront Energy Transfer Partners…
democracynow.org

Jackson Browne, Bonnie Raitt Hosting Standing Rock Benefit

Jackson Browne, Bonnie Raitt, will Stand with Standing Rock November 27th at a benefit concert
indiancountrytodaymedianetwork.com

The Dakota Access Pipeline Map Everyone Should See

Standing Rock Sioux Tribe
Yesterday at 9:09am ·
"Map everyone should see"
#standwithstandingrock
#nodapl
This pipeline could endanger the drinking water of millions.
huffingtonpost.com

Native Hoop Magazine shared Myron Dewey's live video.

Native Hoop Magazine shared Myron Dewey's live video.
-4:18
28,370 Views
Myron Dewey was live.
Update

lyrics to the hymn the Dakota 38 sang on the way to the gallows.

109,463 Views
Michelle Mills
Yesterday at 6:40pm ·
I found this a few days back in the archives of my email. I've been meaning to post it: after today's news of Clergy singing this hymn in Dakota to law enforcement on the front line, I knew it was time to post.
"This song was sung by thirty-eight Dakota Indian prisoners of war as they went to the gallows at Mankato, Minnesota, on December 26, 1862, in the largest mass execution in American history." -- Sidney Bird.
Dakota Hymn - Wakantanka / "Many and Great". Words & Music: Joseph R. Renville (1779-1846); first appeared in the "Dakota Odawan", also known as "Dakota Dowanpi Kin" (1842).
Wakantanka taku nitawa
tankaya qaota;
mahpiya kin eyahnake ca,
makakin he duowanca.
Mniowanca sbeya wanke cin,
hena ovakihi.... #remember #dakota38 #Nodapl #mniwiconi #wopida #SarahWeston #AndrewWeston
  • Sage Ravenwood
Sage Ravenwood https://www.facebook.com/jacqueline.keeler/posts/10154623409648446 Jacqueline Keeler post with the lyrics to the hymn the Dakota 38 sang on the way to the gallows.
Jacqueline Keeler
Yesterday at 11:12am ·
#NoDAPL Dakota hymn being sung by clergy at law enforcement, sung by Dakota 38 in largest mass hanging in US history for the 1862 Dakota Sioux Uprising in Minnesota.
"Dakota Hymn" / Lacquiparle
by Joseph R. Renville (1842), paraphrased by R. Phillip Frazier (1929).
Wakantanka taku nitawa
tankaya qaota;
mahpiya kin eyahnake ca,
makakin he duowanca.
Mniowanca sbeya wanke cin,
hena ovakihi.
Many and great, O God, are your works,
Maker of earth and sky;
Your hands have set the heaven with stars;
Your fingers spread the mountains and plains.
See, at your word the waters were formed;
Deep seas obey your voice.
Your will, mysterious and so strong,
Brings growth to all the earth.
Food for our souls and clothing to wear
Are like your cup that blesses and fills.
Provide for us each day of our lives
Sufficient for our needs.
Grant unto us communion with you,
O star-abiding One;
Come unto us and dwell here with us,
With you are found the gifts of life,
Bless us with life that has no end,
Eternal life with you.
That day you came to dwell on the earth,
Bringing us all great joy!
The nations scattered over the world;
To them you gave the light of all life,
O Lord, O Compassionate One,
We offer praise to you.
Wakantanka / "Many and Great". Words & Music: Joseph R. Renville (1779-1846); first appeared in the "Dakota Odawan", also known as "Dakota Dowanpi Kin" (Boston, 1842). Of the hymns published in that book, this is the only one for which the original melody is known to have been a traditional Native American tune.
NOTES:
"The tune LACQUIPARLE means 'lake that speaks,' and is the tune sung by the Dakota Indians as they escorted their dead to their final resting place." -- William J. Reynolds.
"This song was sung by thirty-eight Dakota Indian prisoners of war as they went to the gallows at Mankato, Minnesota, on December 26, 1862, in the largest mass execution in American history." -- Sidney Bird. (The time scheduled for the execution was 10:00 AM.)

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